Investment Properties

In general, to invest is to allocate money (or sometimes another resource, such as time) in the expectation of some benefit in the future – for example, investment in durable goods, in real estate by the service industry, in factories for manufacturing, in product development, and in research and development.

Investors, particularly novices, are often advised to adopt a particular investment strategy and diversify their portfolio. Diversification has the statistical effect of reducing overall risk.

An investor may bear a risk of loss of some or all of their capital invested, whereas in saving (such as in a bank deposit) the risk of loss in nominal value is normally remote. (Note that if the currency of a savings account differs from the account holder’s home currency, then there is the risk that the exchange rate between the two currencies will move unfavorably, so that the value in the account holder’s home currency of the savings account decreases.)

Speculation involves a level of risk which is greater than most investors would generally consider justified by the expected return. An alternative characterization of speculation is its short-term, opportunistic nature.

The traditional belief that home ownership is a necessary milestone to acquiring wealth still holds. Not everyone considers their home as a long-term Property investment asset; some believe they can get better returns in other assets . By owning a home to live in, the owner not only saves on rent but also benefits from any long-term price appreciation. And investors, those that buy a home to rent out, are in it primarily for financial gains, be it monthly cash flow income, long-term gain, or a combination of both. But, investors and live-in home owners alike should care for the net returns a home can yield, since it is, for most, the single largest investment they will ever make.